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NY Sports Gambling Regulations to Get a Public Review

A regulatory draft for sports betting was approved in January 2019 but has not undergone public review.

The gambling rules will apply to the casino in upstate New York that want to provide sports gambling and is subject to a 60-day public comment period. After the 60 days, the regulations may change. The commentary period does not start until the rules are published.

A Gaming Commission spokesperson state that the group has “every reason to believe” that the proposed regulations will be published in the New York register by March 20. The Commission spokesperson emphasized that the organization was not in control of publication and that the rules are being “processed in standard due course.”

The timetable indicates that sports betting will not begin until at least a year after the US Supreme Court opened the door to state regulations.

In the meantime, industry advocates are pushing for New York to embrace a broader rollout of sports betting. The implementation will include online options and additional gaming operators. Governor Cuomo’s administration has taken the stance that a limited rollout is the only option based on New York’s constitution.

More on New York Gambling Regulations

Joe Addabbo, a Democrat from Queens and the point person on betting issues, in the New York Senate, met with the governor’s office to talk about sports gambling. Addabbo stated that the administration was receptive to the notion that sports gambling should be available to a broader group of operators.

Even though Senate Democrats were reluctant to embrace gambling expansions in the past, Addabbo stated that this year’s calculus is different because of the revenue shortfall facing New York.

New York Gambling Laws

In terms of gambling, whether its slot machines or horse racing, the gambling industry is subject to state regulations. Since each state has a different history when it comes to gambling, it stands to reason that state-specific gambling laws range from strict to liberal. The most common forms of United States gaming are horse racing, gambling in commercial casinos, pari-mutuel betting, and charitable gambling. For charitable gambling, the proceeds are donated to charitable organizations. The state lottery and gaming at tribal casinos are also common in the US.

Gambling laws in New York have limited gambling to Native American casinos and betting on horse racing. However, gaming regulation is changing in the Empire State. Voters approved an amendment to the state constitution that allows Vegas-style casinos in New York in 2013.

Below are some of the highlights of the fundamental laws in New York about gambling.

According to Penal Code 225.00 et seq; 47A:101 et seq; RV&B 47A 518,  gambling is classified as:

Staking or risking something of value upon the outcome of a contest of chance or a future contingent event not under the person’s control, upon an agreement that he/she will receive something of value, given a particular event.

Off-track betting and horse racing is defined as:

Licensed horse and harness racing legal. Off-track pari-mutuel wagering at licensed facilities legal.

Off-track or dog race betting is not specified in New York laws.

Are Casinos Allowed In New York?

New York regulations state that: up to 7 new casinos will be permitted, in addition to 5 Indian-run casinos upstate.

Other Forms of Legalized Gambling

gambling is also permitted in New York. This form of gambling is classified as:

Promoting gambling; possession of gambling records; bookmaking; possession of gambling devices illegal. Games of chance sponsored by bona fide charitable organizations allowed. Social, private gambling is permitted.

State gambling laws are continually changing, mainly due to the 2018 Supreme Court decision to permit sports gambling. Gamblers in New York are encouraged to contact a gaming attorney in the state and to research to verify state regulations before participating in gaming activities.

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